CBD Oil For Rheumatoid Arthritis

CBD oil

CBD oil molecule

What is CBD Oil and RA?

CBD oil stands for cannabidiol oil.  Cannabidiol is a cannabinoid derived from the cannabis sativa or cannabis ruderalis pot plants.  Cannabidiol has therapeutic effects in many conditions for which research is currently pending.  Originally, THC, the most abundant and psychoactive component of marijuana, was thought to confer all the medical benefits of the plant.  Regular medical marijuana users use CBD content to determine how relaxing the strain they use may be, comparing the CBD to the THC and getting the ratio.  For less high and more medical effects, users use lower THC and higher CBD marijuana.  Cannabidiol, when it was discovered, it was thought to be inactive, despite making up as much as 40 % of the extract of the cannabis plants.  In the US, cannabidiol is widely used for a multitude of pain related illnesses but is only approved for childhood epilepsy.  It has been discovered that CBD may have even more medical benefits than THC.

CBD Oil is an extraction of cannabidiol into oil.  Typically, it contains low or undetectable levels of THC.  In the United States, most states legalize the use of CBD oil with low or no THC content, typically defined as THC below 0.03%.  While one can theoretically be prosecuted for possessing oil with very low THC content in some states, this appears to be a rare occurrence.  If unsure, check your state or jurisdiction’s laws.  You can learn about weed laws and what symptoms are allowed to be treated on our site here: http://www.ncsm.nl/english/business-law/medical-marijuana-card

You can make your own CBD oil with a high CBD marijuana strain such as Harlequin by following the instructions on our site here: http://www.ncsm.nl/english/diy/make-cannabis-tincture-recipes

You need to find the best strain to make your oil by reading up on our site.  Choose Harlequin, Cannatonic, or ACDC for high CBD.  Choose other strains for a mix of CBD and THC.  Use our strain guide here: http://www.ncsm.nl/strain

What is RA?

RA stands for Rheumatoid Arthritis.  Rheumatoid Arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which factors in the immune system attack the joints, causing pain, swelling, and lack of fine motor control.  Osteoarthritis is a different from of arthritis, caused by wear and tear.  Both forms could show benefits from treatment with CBD oil.

Hemp Oil Benefits for Arthritis

The million-dollar question is does CBD oil help arthritis pain?  Some good studies have been done on the issue.  CBD oil usually comes from hemp plants rather than psychoactive marijuana plants, and it is therefore legal and widely available in many states in the US.  Hemp oil is being used in many conditions to relieve pain and inflammation.  People want to know of the best CBD oil for arthritis.  Recent studies have shown that CBD oil helps in many inflammatory conditions.

A research study done in 2011 published in neuroscience demonstrates from a rat model of arthritis treated with cannabidiol analogue O-1602, that a reduction in pain and inflammation was observed (Schuelert & McDougall, 2011).

A study in 2017 published in Pain observed a reduction of pain and inflammation in treating osteoarthritis in rats with cannabidiol (Philpott, O’brien, & McDougall, 2017).

A 2016 study of a transdermal dose of CBD in a rat model of arthritis reduced pain behaviors and inflammation (Hammell, et al., 2016).

There are many other studies which show CBD oil can reduce arthritis symptoms.  A patented formula called Sativex, containing CBD and THC has also been found effective for arthritis.  This formula is available in the UK and many other countries.  It is currently under clinical study in the US to determine if it causes an improvement in arthritis symptoms and other conditions.

How to Use CBD Oil for Joint Pain

Standard treatment for arthritis and osteoarthritis include physical therapy for the hands and knees, occupational therapy, medications like NSAIDS (ibuprofen, naproxen), acetaminophen, sometimes powerful medications for autoimmunity like methotrexate.  Opioids are sometimes used for pain but can have deadly side effects such as addiction and fatal overdose.  Surgery is rarely used but may sometimes be necessary.  The pharmaceutical treatments all come with side effects.  Ibuprofen can be hard on the stomach, methotrexate is cytotoxic.  CBD oil has the upside of having few side effects.  Normal dosing can be applied topically or ingested with only the side effect of possible cotton mouth and dry eyes.  Alcohol based CBD spray can cause burning and lesions, therefore oil is preferred (Scully, Hancocks, & Brand, 2007).  In spray form, just 2.5 mg under the tongue is used for multiple sclerosis.  In social anxiety disorder, doses as high as 600 mg are well tolerated.  15 mg to 50 mg are standard doses for pain such as in arthritis.  A 2011 survey concluded CBD oil has a good side effect profile which is benign (Bergamaschi, Queiroz, Zuardi, & Crippa, 2011).

Can You Use CBD Oil For ADHD?

Anecdotal reports of using CBD without THC for ADHD can be effective in reducing some symptoms, especially hyperactivity and anxiety.  Many people with ADHD self-medicate with cannabis, others get it prescribed medically.  It is theorized that the active constituent which is providing relief is actually the CBD and not the THC.  This may be the case.  Since CBD oil without THC is legal, such a preparation can be used even for children or for adult ADHD.  When ordering CBD online, be sure to choose a product which contains no THC.

User Reviews

cbd oil user reviews

This exchange appeared at the message boards at cbdboard.com.  The user asks if CBD oil may help after knee reconstruction.  The cartilage is worn down, this suggests osteoarthritis.  The responses indicate users are confident it will help fight pain and inflammation.

cbd oil user reviews

This is a similar exchange which appears at https://community.qvc.com/t5/Wellness/Anyone-use-CBD-oil-for-pain-relief/td-p/3662134.  It is very promising as it says CBD oil has been effective for the user for knee pain from arthritis and that some are able to get off powerful opioids with dangerous side effects by using CBD oil.

Conclusion

There is ample evidence from both research and anecdotal reports that CBD oil can be effective for pain and inflammation associated with arthritis, osteoarthritis, and symptoms of both childhood and adult ADHD.  Ask your doctor for dosing advice.  Typical dosing is around 15 to 50 mgs, but some users use doses of 600 mg and even double that as the upper limit for some conditions.  It’s best to start low and raise the dose until it has the desired effect and few side effects.  It is generally well-tolerated.  Overdose can result in a panic attack but is not otherwise dangerous.

Disclaimers

General Medical Disclaimer

NCSM and its staff are not medical doctors and not dispensing medical advice.  We are expert literary researchers and self-hackers.
FDA Disclaimer

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease or ailment. 

Drug Screening Disclaimer

It is up to the user to choose a CBD product which displays its lab testing results to indicate that it contains NO THC.  If this is not done, it is possible the product could contain THC levels which are not legal (most states allow up to 0.03% THC, a trace amount which may occur during processing).  If you use a CBD product which contains any THC, you could fail a drug test, so be sure to use a product with proof of zero THC.  NCSM is not responsible for any failed drug test and is only dispensing information about CBD oil.

Thank you for reading and we hope this information will enhance your life.

Bibliography

Bergamaschi, M. M., Queiroz, R. H., Zuardi, A. W., & Crippa, J. A. (2011). Safety and Side Effects of Cannabidiol, a Cannabis sativa Constituent. Current Drug Safety, 6(4), 237-249. Retrieved 8 25, 2018, from http://eurekaselect.com/75752/article

Hammell, D., Zhang, L., Abshire, S., McIlwrath, S., Stinchcomb, A., & Westlund, K. N. (2016). Transdermal cannabidiol reduces inflammation and pain-related behaviours in a rat model of arthritis. European Journal of Pain, 20(6), 936-948. Retrieved 8 25, 2018, from https://ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmc4851925

Philpott, H. T., O’brien, M., & McDougall, J. J. (2017). Attenuation of early phase inflammation by cannabidiol prevents pain and nerve damage in rat osteoarthritis. Pain, 158(12), 2442-2451. Retrieved 8 25, 2018, from https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00006396-900000000-99152

Schuelert, N., & McDougall, J. J. (2011). The abnormal cannabidiol analogue O-1602 reduces nociception in a rat model of acute arthritis via the putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55. Neuroscience Letters, 500(1), 72-76. Retrieved 8 25, 2018, from https://ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21683763

Scully, C., Hancocks, S., & Brand, H. (2007). Adverse effects from a cannabis spray. Retrieved 8 25, 2018, from https://researchgate.net/profile/h_brand/publication/232799833_adverse_effects_from_a_cannabis_spray/links/0a85e53b1b7ab7f166000000.pdf

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